FRITE- the rich text editor with Right-to-left languages

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Posted by Hafed | Posted in PJCs/Javabeans | Posted on 27-03-2009

I have been working on adapting FRITE, the rich text editor to work with right to left languages such as Arabic and Hebrew and the results are here.

Arabic

FRITE Rich text editor in Arabic

Hebrew – Translation of “Here is how my Hebrew text should look like in FRITE” courtesy of

Frite- rich text editor in Hebrew

The only addition to the code was the following statement:

document.putProperty(“i18n”, Boolean.TRUE);

But I still need to validate the overall workflow with users that work with Arabic or Hebrew on a daily basis.

I guess the same applies for Persian, Urdu and other right to left languages.

Rich text editor or HTML editor for Oracle Forms: Decision time !

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Posted by Hafed | Posted in Forms, oracle, PJCs/Javabeans | Posted on 16-01-2009

A project that I started in September 2008 was motivated by the lack of rich text editors in Forms applications. Francois Degrelle has already provided an HTML editable bean that can provide adequate styling.

However, there are situations where features, comparable to those found on such editors as TinyMCE, are needed.

Based on this requirement, I started the project and quickly put together a bean that allowed several styling beyond Bold, Italic and left justified, etc.

However, one question remained and that one is related to the exact type of editor: should it be a rich text or HTML editor ?

While the difference might not be obvious, it is clear there are differences between the two. The main one being the font support. Remember that a Forms application is supposed to run on any supported platform and as such, and I believe that’s the case for most implementations, application servers are most of the time deployed on UNIX/LINUX boxes in addition to Windows servers.

With that in mind, I opted for an HTML editor with one strong requirement: support for printing through Oracle reports. The reason has to do with the way the editor will be used.

In most cases, it is not going to be used for blogs or whatever but simply to provide rich text editing for ITEMS in a Forms application and here we are talking about business (back-end) applications that ultimately output data to printers or pdf documents.

A Dashboard styled Oracle Forms bean

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Posted by Hafed | Posted in oracle, PJCs/Javabeans | Posted on 16-01-2009

Here is another dashboard styled bean that can be used in BI screens. While it can be used for this specific purpose, it can be used in other areas as well.

Dashboard style bean

The screenshot above shows the bean with the value that is set from the Forms canvas. This can also be fetched from a table and triggered by the Timer bean for example.

The current value displayed by the bean can be retrieved using the Forms custom item built-in.

A number of properties have been included with this bean in order to allow specific customization to be carried out by developers. Future versions will include other properties that will enhance the graphic aesthetics.

Download bean, FMB, technical note and source code

Oracle Forms Javabean Property Editor

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Posted by Hafed | Posted in Forms, oracle, PJCs/Javabeans | Posted on 16-01-2009

As I was finalizing the technical note for another gauge bean, it hit me that I wasted quite some time designing the visual part of the bean. In Oracle Forms, you create the bean on the canvas, assign it a height and width and then set up the implementation class.

Now, in order to customize it, you would have to follow the bean’s developer recommendations and use the set_custom_property built-in in order to modify the bean properties. However, this implies that as a developer, you would have to compile and run the module each time in order to see the result.

In my case, it requires a number of iterations and that bothers me quite a bit. That’s where I suddenly realized that when I designed MouliForms, I created a class that was basically a clone of the Oracle Forms property palette editor ( Remember F4 !!).

I asked myself whether I can extend the same concept to Forms javabeans and here what I think should come out in a few days (hopefully not weeks):

  • Create an XML file that lists the bean’s properties, categories they belong to and type (String, Int or boolean).
  • From the property palette editor, read and parse the XML file.
  • Developer will select the values for each property and then Preview the bean
  • If the developer is fine with the design, output the bean init procedure as an Oracle Forms program unit.
  • I guess that should do it and could be very useful.

    Gauge with thermometer style display- Javabean for Oracle Forms 9i-10g

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    Posted by Hafed | Posted in Forms, oracle, PJCs/Javabeans | Posted on 14-01-2009

    Increasingly, power users are requiring more and more info in a manageable form. This is the case with dashboards and financial screens.

    There are already a number of javabeans that can be quickly deployed with Oracle Forms 10g and the PJC depot at http://forms.pjc.bean.over-blog.com/ lists a number of very useful beans. On OTN, you can also download a number of beans and the BIgraph bean is one of them and provides a number of charts.

    While there are other visual display beans designed with the JAVA community in mind, only a few are available for Oracle Forms users.

    In attempt to alleviate this problem, we propose a basic bean that is styled like a thermometer. While it can be used for this specific purpose, it can be used in other areas as well.

    thermometer bean

    The screenshot above shows the bean with the value that is set from the Forms canvas. This can also be fetched from a table and triggered by the Timer bean for example.

    The current value displayed by the bean can be retrieved using the Forms custom item built-in.

    A number of properties have been included with this bean in order to allow specific customization to be carried out by developers. Future versions will include other properties that will enhance the graphic aesthetics.

    Download bean, FMB, technical note and source code

    Oracle Forms 10g- Using Static Google Maps with HTTP geocoding service

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    Posted by Hafed | Posted in Forms, oracle, PJCs/Javabeans | Posted on 02-01-2009

    Here is an update with the files for implementing a javabean that displays a static google map for a given location.

    In a number of back-end applications, users as well as entities are registered with their address information. In some cases, it is desired to provide a visual representation of this address information.
    A free service that is provided by Google allows us to obtain the map for a given address as well as additional info such as directions from a given point to this address.

    This is a bit difficult to implement in Oracle Forms 10g since the Google API is based on Javascript. In those cases where Javascript is blocked or not possible, Google provides another service which is called Google Static maps.

    What this service provides is a static image of the map based on the address information. This can be sufficient in a number of Forms applications.

    In this note, we provide a javabean that will display the static map in addition to the latitude and longitude corresponding to the address provided by the user (or fetched from a table).

    First, we will use the Google Maps HTTP geocoding service to retrieve the latitude and longitude. Then, we use this data to fetch the static map from the Google static map service.

    Static Google Map Javabean output-Oracle forms 10g

    This javabean can be used either with the SUN JRE or Oracle Jinitiator. It has been tested with Jinitiator 1.3.1.22 and 1.3.1.29.

    Download the jar, java file, sample FMB and the technical note

    Please note that the javabean has also been submitted to the Pluggable Java Component & JavaBean ‘s library website maintained by Francois Degrelle.